Vintage Clothing Store Staples

February 4, 2019 by  
Filed under Featured, Lifestyle, News & Information, Sales & Discounts

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2019 Vintage Collection

Why your shop is defined by its staples.

The different products that you purchase regularly and out of necessity are considered “staple goods” to your vintage store. In the past, these items have fewer markdowns but solid profit margins. While price trends may raise or lower demand for other products, the demand for staple goods rarely changes when prices change. They are the necessary items for you to remain in business.

What are staple goods in your Vintage Store

Staple goods are any items in your inventory that are core to your business. They are also known as any staple products, staples, core products, and necessity goods. For example, vintage jeans and t-shirts are staples for any serious vintage clothing store. Skateboards are staples for skate shops. Golf balls are a staple product for a golf shop. If you have a store without staple products, then your store doesn’t stand for anything or isn’t representing anything special to your clients. Read more

My Freedamn! JAPANESE VINTAGE SO-CAL 2 NYC

When it comes to collecting vintage clothing from the United States the Japanese buyers have been paving the path for nearly 30 years. Since the eighties Japanese vintage collectors have been traveling across the United States hitting up thrift stores, vintage stores, clothing flea markets and just about anywhere they could find old vintage jeans, leather jackets, sneakers or t-shirts.

As the vintage clothing culture became more popular in Japan and the demand grew collectors began to find new ways to locate more product. Because each vintage piece is essentially a one-off it is difficult to determine the actual size and fit without trying it on. One problem the collectors had was finding vintage pieces that were not only the correct size but the way the garment fit had to be perfect as well. To overcome this obstacle they hired hip Japanese boys and girls that were the perfect body shape to match the sizes that they were looking for.

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How to Build a Clothing Display Rack Using Reclaimed Pallets

September 12, 2017 by  
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clothing display rack

clothing display rack

Factory Vintage has just put out a free download on how to build a sustainable clothing display rack using reclaimed pallets. The step by step PDF goes into to detail on what supplies are needed and how to assemble the display. What better way to show off amazing reclaimed pieces than on a sustainable display rack made of reclaimed items.

Get the Free Download Here

clothing display rack

60′s PSYCHEDELIA & THE BIRTH OF SURF ART | THE LEGEND OF ARTIST RICK GRIFFIN

July 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Art, Featured, Lifestyle, News & Information, Resourcful, Surfing

Rick Griffin is known as a surfer, cartoonist, psychedelic poster artist, legend. Griffin was born near Palos Verdes in 1944, where he took-up surfing at age 14. While he was still in high school in the 50’s he was heavily influenced by Mad magazines comic styling but he soon found his own voice, creating his own surf style that would become iconic. Through his undeniable artistic talent and connections through surfing, Griffin was soon working for surf legend, Greg Noll, among others. After graduating from high school he joined Surfer Magazine as a staff artist– creating the legendary California surf scene character Murphy, and working his way up to Art Director by the time he was of 20. But by 1964, Griffin decided it was time to move on and see what the world outside of So Cal’s tight-knit surfer scene had for him.
View the original article SURF, 60′s PSYCHEDELIA & BORN AGAIN | THE TRINITY OF ARTIST RICK GRIFFIN at The Selvedge Yard
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Cold Water Surfing… the legend of Jack O’neill

surf clothing history

Any one that has ever pulled a thin piece of rubber over their shoulders so that they can paddle out into the cold pounding surf has Jack O’neill to thank for making that secession possible. His little shop in San Francisco is now a multimillion-dollar empire, but that wasn’t why Jack O’Neill began. He just wanted to stay warm. “I’m just as surprised by this as anyone,” O’Neill says. “I was just messing around with rubber.”

surfshop

Jack O’Neill was born in Denver, Colorado, in 1923 and was raised in Portland, Oregon. It wasn’t long before he and his family moved to Southern California. He wandered as a lad, working as a lumberjack, serving in the Army Air Corps and then moving to San Francisco in 1949. Living in San Francisco, O’Neill earned a living as a commercial fisherman, then sold architectural aluminum, fire extinguishers and skylights. He loved the ocean and sneaked away to it at every opportunity, even taking his lunch breaks down at Ocean Beach, bodysurfing in bathing trunks in the briny cold, often alone or with the odd diehard.

vintage surf clothes

Jack O’Neill started his empire when he began experimenting with materials that would prevent him from, quite literally, freezing his nuts off. It all started when he began by stuffing flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) into bathing trunks “borrowed” from the Sutro Baths or Fleishacker Pool. Those worked well enough for Jack to begin a family with his wife, Marge. But early wetsuits took a huge step forward when a scientist friend showed O’Neill a sample of neoprene foam.

surfing apparel wholesale

Before Jack O’Neill, surfing in Northern California’s chilly waters was a rugged sport practiced by hardy men. It was he who kept searching for a practical way to keep warm, and it was he who worked persistently to develop the modern neoprene wetsuit, one of the most important innovations in surfing history. Other individuals have also contributed to the evolution of the wetsuit, but Jack O’Neill is the man perhaps most responsible for surfing’s endless summer.

o'neill wetsuits

 

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