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Science Friction

recycled magazine chair

Paper is hands down one of the biggest success stories when it comes to recycling. We are slowly gaining ground with aluminum, plastic and textiles but we still have such a long way to come. Designer Merryn Haines-Gold has come up with a way to recycle paper other than throwing it into the blue bin, he made a chair. To make this great chair he used the recycled wooden frame from an old directors chair and old magazines along with loose bits of paper to remake it into a functioning chair.

Friction from the design holds the chair together, not glue. Each piece of paper is laid over each other, similar to like when you are shuffling a deck of cards wrapped with a a single strip of plastic. The seat bonded to the chair by tie wraps that are connected through small holes that are drilled into the paper.

The design is a available for sale, but the designer also presents it as a DIY project for you go getters out there.

That is the beauty of the idea, it is very simple and can be recreated anywhere with any magazine you wish, it also does not even have to be a magazine, it can be loose bits of paper, as long as they are roughly the same shape and the surfaces are able to engage with each other, the friction will do the rest…..just don’t leave it outside.

This looks like a fun weekend project for just about anyone out there. Next time you see a beat up directors chair at a garage sale or flea market keep this idea in mind. With a collection of some old magazines you can have a cool green project to work on. At the very best you will have a great new art piece that people can sit in, at the very least you will learn a little bit about how friction works.

Source courtesy of Treehugger.com and http://www.mezhg.com/
Image Courtesy of http://www.mezhg.com/

Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Garden : Season Two

Rooftop Garden

The Worlds Largest Rooftop garden has just kicked off it’s second growing season.

The second season is in full swing for the rooftop urban farmers at Brooklyn Grange Located atop a six-story 1919 warehouse. Krista Leahy at Inhabitat just did a great piece on this 40,000 square foot organic rooftop farm built by Bromley Caldari architects on a random rooftop in Brooklyn.

“After a successful first growing and selling season that began last spring, the farmers at Brooklyn Grange are continuing their production of organic produce that includes 40 varietals of juicy tomatoes, peppers, fennel, salad greens, kale, swiss chard, beans of all sorts and a variety of delicious root vegetables like beets, carrots, and radishes, as well as plenty of herbs.”

Brooklyn Grange’s organic produce is grown in 7.5″ deep beds with rooflite soil. This soil is produces by Pennsylvania soil company Skyland, Rooflite. This special soil is a lightweight soil composed of organic matter compost and small porous stones wich break down to add trace minerals that are needed for the produce to grow into a healthy mature state. The farm has a nine month growing season and everything that they grow is sustainable and good for you. In the winter time they used cover-crops like rye, buckwheat, vetch and clove to produce year around.

Rooftop Garden

Brooklyn Grange is looking to expand to many more rooftops in an attempt to increase the education and training available to those interested in urban farming. Check out their website at brooklyngrangefarm.com

Source & Images Courtesy of Inhabitat

Functional Food and Sustainable Packages

cardboard people
This weekend was the annual gathering of ancient grains, coconut water, fair trade chocolates, protein bars, and organic pet food in Orange County, that is at least where where baobab and sea buckthorn joined acai, goji berry and chia seeds, the reigning antioxidant-rich superfoods. There was overwhelming sea of 3,000 exhibitors, displayed across the exhibit floor of enticing organic foods, healthy items and green goods at the annual Natural Products Expo West convention and conference, March 10-13, seemed like all the world eats well and lives sustainably. But then reality struck.

There are mMore than 56,000 gathered for this 31st fest, with an increased visibility on non-GMO foods and eco-packaging. With aisle after aisle of vendors from Nature’s Path to Earth Balance, from omega-rich supplements to “pure” and “smart” items, it’s clear the message was healthy and environmental. Compared to two years ago, it was hard to find a plastic bottled water booth, through other drinks overflowed from teas to brain tonics, digestive beverages to chillout elixirs.

Green Packageing container

To us, one of the big hits of this event was Seventh Generation’s new cardboard bottle for its Natural 4X Laundry Detergent. We love great designs, but green packaging is just one small part of a sustainable design and product. Designed with Ecologic Brands, it features a recyclable and compostable outer shell of recycled newspapers and cardboard and a recyclable monopolymer film pouch inside with no nylon or laminates. It reduces the plastic by 66 percent and when empty, it’s stackable. so nine times more efficient to ship.

Small Storage Green House


There is one active Dutch designer named Daniel Schipper who created the foldable greenhouse for city gardens and rooftop terrariums. These gardens are made from recycled plastics, the greenhouse roof folds up flat for easy storage and transience. The base is also made from recycled plastic composite and its lack of framework or support materials makes it a minimalist no-fuss appliance. Just unfold, snap, and water.


Schipper’s foldable greenhouse has been causing quite a stir in the Netherlands as he searches for a production partnership to bring it to the global market. It’s just one of many innovative creations from his Amsterdam studio which focuses on concept, research and design having completed. Many of Schipper’s projects emphasize sustainability, functionality and fold-ability.

Rocking Chair Powers Its Attached OLED Lamp


The Murakami chair’s attached lamp is powered by kinetic energy produced from the chair’s rocking back and forth deliciously simple and elegant. Oh, and that lampshade? Not a lampshade. That’s the actual OLED light source, shaped like a lampshade. The OLED lamp even senses when it’s light or dark out, and if it’s light, stores the energy produced by rocking in a battery pack until nightfall. The chair, designed by Rochus Jacob, rightfully shared first prize at the DesignBoom Green Life Competition.


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