Eco Friendly




5 Vintage Wholesale New Years Resolutions

vintage clothing retro
1. Buy less and buy smart: Check those labels. Search out brands and products that reflect your recycled lifestyle. There can be a huge difference in the contents of everyday items like laundry detergent, household cleaners and more. Don’t rush out to buy the next new thing you see on Good Mornig America of Dr. Phil. Garages and basements all over the world are filled with junk that we really didn’t need – the solution – don’t buy that crap in the first place. It’s important to support brands and products that reflect your values (stay out of that big box store). Don’t be a victim of fads and the mega-brand marketing machine. Look for items that perform more than one function so you can Do more with less.

2. Keep it local: Shop at your local vintage store instead at the mall. Buy veggies from local farms and farmers. Search out local craftsman for things like furniture and home decor – items that can often be made of reclaimed wood are usually of the highest quality. Keep small businesses alive.

3. Recycle and reuse more: Make sure you go the extra step in getting your refuse into your local recycling stream and out of the landfill. Also, forget using paper towels and small versions of things (like bottled water) that come in plastic containers. Start using simple things like reusable dish towels, reusable water and drink bottles and reusable grocery bags. Little things can make a big difference.

4. Try to live more sustainably: Install a new programmable thermostat in your house, it will help you save time and energy. Start a garden. If possible, grow your own fruits and veggies. Even apartment dwellers can start a container garden or kitchen herb garden. Gardening can help both your pocketbook and your waistline. Purchase vintage clothing and used products to save money and add some character and style to your home or wardrobe. If you’re at the beach or a park, pick up some trash to help the community – you can never have enough clean, natural space.

5. Drive less and drive ‘green’: Be aware of your driving patterns. Drivers can increase their gas mileage and reduce their emissions by driving sensibly. No quick starts and stops. Use that HOV lane and cruise control. If you have a short commute or your grocery store is nearby hit the streets on your bicycle and save on fuel and emissions. Make your next car a fuel efficient model.

Patagonia Steps it Up Even More

Patagonia Westsuits

The clothing company Patagonia has always been one of our favorite brands. For years they been environmentally conscious through their ethical business practices. Not only do they make great outerwear for men and women, but their wetsuits are some of the best in the industry and have changed the way surfers around the world view cold water waves and sustainable products.

Patagonia continues to lead the pack with their sustainable approach in their 2011 collection of outerwear for both men and women, even children. All of their threads are recyclable through their Common Threads Recycling Program plus more than half of their collection is made by using environmentally conscience fabrics.

Vintage Patagonia Outerwear

Patagonia has always been known to merge fashion with function even in their past Vintage Patagonia collections. The latest 2011 collection is no exception, take a look at some of their latest pieces:

Patagonia Outerwear

This season, Patagonia has revamped their merino wool collection with a new blend of 80% merino wool and 20% recycled polyester that are Bluesign-approved and chlorine-free. Patagonia claims that the garments provide odor control and are breathable. The merino comes from farmers in Australia who practice sustainable land management and do do not perform mulesing.

Patagonia Sweater
Patagonia’s iconic Synchilla Snap-T Pullover and Re-Tool Hoody make a comeback this season with vintage prints and retro colors, drawing inspiration from the brand’s archives.

Visit Patagonia for more Information.

Science Friction

recycled magazine chair

Paper is hands down one of the biggest success stories when it comes to recycling. We are slowly gaining ground with aluminum, plastic and textiles but we still have such a long way to come. Designer Merryn Haines-Gold has come up with a way to recycle paper other than throwing it into the blue bin, he made a chair. To make this great chair he used the recycled wooden frame from an old directors chair and old magazines along with loose bits of paper to remake it into a functioning chair.

Friction from the design holds the chair together, not glue. Each piece of paper is laid over each other, similar to like when you are shuffling a deck of cards wrapped with a a single strip of plastic. The seat bonded to the chair by tie wraps that are connected through small holes that are drilled into the paper.

The design is a available for sale, but the designer also presents it as a DIY project for you go getters out there.

That is the beauty of the idea, it is very simple and can be recreated anywhere with any magazine you wish, it also does not even have to be a magazine, it can be loose bits of paper, as long as they are roughly the same shape and the surfaces are able to engage with each other, the friction will do the rest…..just don’t leave it outside.

This looks like a fun weekend project for just about anyone out there. Next time you see a beat up directors chair at a garage sale or flea market keep this idea in mind. With a collection of some old magazines you can have a cool green project to work on. At the very best you will have a great new art piece that people can sit in, at the very least you will learn a little bit about how friction works.

Source courtesy of Treehugger.com and http://www.mezhg.com/
Image Courtesy of http://www.mezhg.com/

Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Garden : Season Two

Rooftop Garden

The Worlds Largest Rooftop garden has just kicked off it’s second growing season.

The second season is in full swing for the rooftop urban farmers at Brooklyn Grange Located atop a six-story 1919 warehouse. Krista Leahy at Inhabitat just did a great piece on this 40,000 square foot organic rooftop farm built by Bromley Caldari architects on a random rooftop in Brooklyn.

“After a successful first growing and selling season that began last spring, the farmers at Brooklyn Grange are continuing their production of organic produce that includes 40 varietals of juicy tomatoes, peppers, fennel, salad greens, kale, swiss chard, beans of all sorts and a variety of delicious root vegetables like beets, carrots, and radishes, as well as plenty of herbs.”

Brooklyn Grange’s organic produce is grown in 7.5″ deep beds with rooflite soil. This soil is produces by Pennsylvania soil company Skyland, Rooflite. This special soil is a lightweight soil composed of organic matter compost and small porous stones wich break down to add trace minerals that are needed for the produce to grow into a healthy mature state. The farm has a nine month growing season and everything that they grow is sustainable and good for you. In the winter time they used cover-crops like rye, buckwheat, vetch and clove to produce year around.

Rooftop Garden

Brooklyn Grange is looking to expand to many more rooftops in an attempt to increase the education and training available to those interested in urban farming. Check out their website at brooklyngrangefarm.com

Source & Images Courtesy of Inhabitat

Certified Organic Wool

Certified Organic Wool

Certified Organic Wool | Image Courtesy of treehugger.com

At Dust Factory Vintage Clothing we always look forward to new to new seasons fashion collections, this coming Autumn/Winter 2011 is no exception.

Our favorite go to choice for fabrics is Recycled Textiles, however our favorite natural fiber of the season is organic wool. But as EcoSalon’s Amy DuFault points out (via Ecco Eco), there are both “environmental and ethical complexities of this natural fiber we so adore.

Last year O-Wool, the leading certified-organic wool at the time, was beginning to fold due to financial reasons. Since then, Tooney Wool Company in Philadelphia, PA, has become the new big dog and owner and distributor of certified-organic-yarns. Whose past clientele list is rather impressive with brands like Patagonia, Timberland, J.Crew, Linda Loudermilk, Diane von Furstenberg, Loomstate, Bahar Shahpar, and Bodkin.

Organic Wool Sheep

Certified Organic Wool | Image Courtesy of Treehugger.com

Tree Hugger has great sideshow presentation with Tom’s of Maine Founder showing you how to Produce Ethical Wool undergarments. Check Here to View!

In an interview with EcoSalon, Jocelyn Tunney, of Tunney Wool Company, says “One would want to purchase organic wool for the same reasons as one would want to purchase organic food.” She continues, below.

It’s a more sustainable farming solution, is kinder to the animals and is healthier for the consumer. Conventional wool is grown like conventional food – the land and sheep are sprayed and dipped in pesticides as a cheap means to increase salable product. The land [certified-]organic wool comes from has to go through the same transition and certification process as the land organic food comes from.”

Let’s not forget when it comes to purchasing wool products the most ecological wool is the the stuff you already have hanging in your closet, recycled wool or what you find at a vintage clothing store or thrift shop is close second. However when you don’t have either of these options you should make sure that you are purchasing certified-organic and mulesing-free wool.

Information Courtesy of Treehugger.com and EcoSalon.com


« Go Back. Previous PageKeep Rollin. Next Page »



vintage wholesale catalog