WARNING – What Every Vintage Clothing Collector should be on the LOOK OUT FOR!

Vintage Clothing Moths
Vintage Clothing is no longer just fashion desired by the fashionistas or hipsters, but is now a trend that people from all walks of life are getting into. There are many benefits to collecting and recycling vintage clothing, less waist, recycling textiles etc… however there are some con’s to collecting old clothing as well.

A recent article in the Daily Mail sheds some light to one of the negative aspects of collecting vintage clothing that come in the form of a little bug and it’s larvae that is a fabric destroyer, at least when it gets into your closet.

clothing moth

Somethings that every vintage clothing warehouse, collector, shop owner or thrift shop buyer should be aware of:

  • Natural fibers found in clothes from 60s and 70s are favorite for moth larvae
  • They cause severe damage to clothing, carpets, leather, fur and fabrics
  • Charity shops and warehouses are perfect breeding ground for moths

Rise in sales of vintage clothing boosts population of clothes moths by 75%

FROM: dailymail.co.uk By: Richard Hartley-parkinson

A growth in the popularity of vintage clothing has led to a resurgence in the number of moth infestations.

In just five years, the number of callouts to experts has gone up by 75 per cent as fashion-conscious Britons spend £40million on outfits from the sixties and seventies.

But clothes from the 1960s and 1970s are often made of natural fibers such as cotton and linen, which contain keratin – a favourite food for moth larvae.

Vintage Moths

The rise in sales of vintage clothing has led to an increase in the population of moths

There has also been a surge in demand for charity shop clothes over that period, as the recession has forced people to cut back on spending.

Nine in ten Brits (89 per cent) now shop on tighter budgets and risk bringing larvae into their home as they buy contaminated second-hand clothing.

Common clothes moths and their larvae thrive in warm, enclosed environments such as wardrobes.

vintage destroyer

Clothes moths have a life cycle of between 65 and 90 days, with the female adult moths living for about 30 days and laying up to 300 eggs

And they are attracted to the smell of sweat, which can become ingrained on older clothes even if undetectable to a human nose.
Clothes moths have a life cycle of between 65 and 90 days, with the female adult moths living for about 30 days and laying up to 300 eggs

Clothes moths have a life cycle of between 65 and 90 days, with the female adult moths living for about 30 days and laying up to 300 eggs

They were once the scourge of Victorian homes and gave rise to the word mothballed, meaning to put something into storage or to suspend operation.

Colm Moore, from Rentokil Pest Control, said: ‘Moths are considered a difficult household pest because of the severe damage their larvae cause to clothes, fabrics, leather, fur, and carpets.

‘We recommend regularly checking for moth eggs and removing them before they hatch.’

Clothes moths have a life cycle of between 65 and 90 days, with the female adult moths living for about 30 days and laying up to 300 eggs.

Clothes bought from charity shops or vintage warehouses are at increased risk of moths because they come into contact with old clothes from so many places.

This means there is a greater chance of them encountering an existing moth infestation, and for that infestation to then be transferred.

Older clothes are more likely to be made from the natural fibers which moths feed on – such as wool, cotton, and cashmere.

Newer garments are increasingly made from synthetic materials, such as polyester.

Article & Images Courtesy of  Daily Mail UK

What do you do if Moths have gotten to your clothes?

 

If you have a collection of vintage clothes affected, or moths have found their way into your closet there are a few things that you can do to remedy the problem. Let’s face it, depending on how bad the outbreak has gotten will determine what drastic measures should be taken. There are however a few home remedies that are worth trying out!

Lavender
moth remediesFill sachets with dried lavender, or dip cotton balls in lavender oil. Then, place in closets, drawers and any other places where clothes are stored.

 

Mint
moth remediesDried mint leaves are another effective moth repellent. Place several leaves in a sachet, or place loose leaves among your clothes.

 

Cedar
moth remediesCedar wood has long been recognized as a moth repellent, and for good reason – it works. If you’re lucky enough to have a cedar-lined closet or chest, be sure to make use of it. Otherwise, pick up some cedar chips or blocks from the store, and place them where needed.

Note: Cedar loses its scent (the repellent aspect) over time. To bring the scent back, sand the cedar lightly, or purchase and bottle of cedar oil, and apply it to the wood.

Cloves, Thyme, Ginseng and Rosemary
moth remediesFill a sachet with one or a combination of these four herbs to keep moths at bay for months.

 

 

Clothing Storage Tips

Clean Clothes Before Storing

Wash all clothing, and dry it in the sun before packing it away at the end of the season. This will help to kill any larvae that may be present in the clothing. Cotton garments can also be ironed as a further deterrent.
Store Clothing in Sealed Containers

Store clothing in sealed containers

chests, plastic storage containers, suitcases, etc.—where moths can’t get to them. may be present in the clothing. Cotton garments can also be ironed as a further deterrent.

Store Clothing in Sealed Containers

Store clothing in sealed containers—chests, plastic storage containers, suitcases, etc.—where moths can’t get to them.



online store warehouse



Speak Your Mind

Tell us what you're thinking...
and oh, if you want a pic to show with your comment, go get a gravatar!