Recycled Clothing




Vintage Cowboy Boots

Wholesale Cowboy Western Boots

Nothing beats the comfort and look of a pair of good vintage western boots.

Someone already did all of the hard work of wearing them in, giving them the perfect look and feel. Another great thing about vintage boots is their construction, they were built to last. Not like boots today that will barely last a season, vintage boots were built to last over lifetimes. That is what  makes our particular collection of vintage boots so special, their history as much as their future.

Dust Factory is running a special on our Vintage Western Boot Collection.

 

- Unisex Mix (For Men and Women) :

12 Pair of Men’s and Women’s Boots Sizes W 6 – M 12 for $144 ($12 a Pair)

- Women’s Mix (For the Ladies):

12 Pair of Men’s and Women’s Boots Sizes W 6 – M 9/W10 for $144 ($12 a Pair)

- Men’s Mix (For the Fellas):

12 Pair of Men’s and Women’s Boots Sizes W 6 – M 9/W10 for $144 ($12 a Pair)

 

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Please remember these are just examples, the exact boots should not be expected in the mix. Boots are available in three mixes :Women’s,Men’s & Unisex
* Womens Mix consists of both mens and womens boots that fit today’s womens foot. Sizes Women’s 6-10 and Men’s sizes 5-8
* Men’s Mix consists of sizes 7-12 Men’s Sizes
* Unisex Mix consists of both mens and womens boots that fit today’s mens & womens feet. Sizes Women’s 6-10 and Men’s sizes 5-12


This Offer is available through our website only.
This Offer is Only Available While Supplies Last.
This Offer is Valid on All Orders Received Before 7/14/2013

The Global Afterlife Of Your Donated Clothes

recycled clothing
BY: Jackie Northam | NPR

On a bright and warm Saturday morning, there’s a steady flow of people dropping off donations at Martha’s Table, a charity in downtown Washington, D.C. A mountain of plastic and paper bags stuffed with used dresses, scarves, skirts and footwear expands in one corner of the room. Volunteers sort and put clothes on hangers. They’ll go on sale next door, the proceeds of which will help the needy in the area.

It’s a scene played out across the U.S.: people donating their old clothes, whether through collection bins or through large charities, to help others. Read more

Wholesale Vintage Clothing 101

vintage warehosue supplier clothing

Are you a buyer for a Vintage Clothing Store? Or are you a vintage clothing shop owner looking for a new supplier for your store? If this is you first time purchasing Vintage Clothing Wholesale for your store, then there is a few things that you should know.

Buying Vintage Clothing Wholesale 101

Where do all of those clothes come from?

Often times vintage clothing suppliers process thousands of pounds of clothing either each day or each week looking for the one of a kind items that store buyers are looking for. The first question that many people new to the vintage clothing industry ask is, “Where do all of the clothes come from?” The quick answer is that they come from all over the world, but the long answer is that they come from donations.

1. It Starts With the Donation

You see each time someone donates clothing either in a donation bin, or by having someone pick up the apparel it is sent to a processing plant where the clothing is broken down into different grades. Lets take the Salvation Army for example, because they are one of the larger clothing recyclers around. Now I am aware that there are many other charities like the Good Will and Chalk, however for the sake of explanation we will use the Salvation Army for our example.

2. Donation Center Processing Plant

The first place donated clothing ends up is at the clothing recycling bin or center. These clothing recycling bins are picked up and dropped off at the local distribution plant. At the processing plant, everything is placed on a conveyor belts, I mean everything. This includes everything that was donated, clothing, accessories, household goods, sheets, textiles etc. These processing plants usually have graders or pullers if you will, that pull out modern items that will be sold in the local  Salvation Army Thrift Stores, or whatever thrift store the processing plant supplies. Just in case you are wondering, this is not the Vintage Clothing, this clothing is going to thrift stores, so the puller in most cases are looking for modern or contemporary clothes, not old stuff.

These processing centers only use 5% of the clothing that they process, the rest of the clothing is moved on. After the pullers at the processing plant are done pulling out items for the local thrift stores, the rest of the clothing is put into large containers, or bales and sold by the pound to under privileged countries or to Rag Houses.

3. The Rag House

Now many Rag Houses or Recycled Textile Facilities, have their own way of taking in donations, if they do not they can purchased used clothing in bulk by the pound from larger charities that break down the grades even more. When the clothing arrives to the Rag house, it is usually packed into large 1000lb bales with specific grades or style. Different Rag Houses play different roles when it comes to recycling clothing. Some Rag houses just process the cottons and linens to be turned in whipping rags, other process different grades to be sold over seas, and some do all of this but also pull out vintage for local buyers. It is these rag houses that process Vintage Clothing that we will talk about today.

Rag Houses that Process Vintage Clothing

Vintage Clothing grades that are processed at the rag house specifically for Vintage Buyers is the next step in following the trail of Vintage Clothing. These grades are usually broken down into Women’sMen’s and children mixes. Some even go as far as breaking down the clothing from different era’s I.E. Women’s Antique Dresses, Branded Three Button Polo Shirts etc. Others do more of a style breakdown, vintage clothing vs modern clothing.

Some times the mixes come as credential grades. This means that the mix has never been touched or handled by anyone. Often times credential grades are nice to get because you know that you are the first person to process the grade. However this means that you have to process everything, the good the bad and the ugly. You will be lucky to be able to use 5% of a credential grade, but you may find just one piece in that grade that is worth it, or not, it is always a gamble when you are recycling clothing.

4. The Vintage Clothing Wholesaler

Vintage Clothing Wholesalers and Suppliers work hand in hand with the rag houses that process vintage clothing, teaching their workers and buyers what is valuable for resale as Vintage. These mixes are then processed and sold to the Vintage Wholesaler so that they can begin processing the mixes for retail buyers.

At Dust Factory we then process the clothing even more breaking down each grade into a specific style and quality. The graders in the Dust Factory processing plants are more advanced when it comes to Vintage Clothing retail, then the graders at the Rag Houses. This is because each grader has had a minimum of three years experience working Vintage Retail before they can start grading for Dust Factory. We have found over the years that this ensures a quality mix for our buyers. What is damaged or stained is then sold to vintage refurbished companies so that the items can be re-constructed into a new garment. What is considered modern or undesirable for vintage buyers is donated to local charities or disaster relief organizations.

The clothing that is used for our mixes is then broken down into size and style runs. This gives our buyers the opportunity to get the same high quality mixes each time. Because we are a bulk wholesaler we do not pull out rare or desirable items for buyers with a limited market, but instead leave these items in our mixes to ensure the quality of our mixes for our bulk buyers. Over the years we have found that it is better not to let buyers hand pick mixes from our grades, this is so that we can keep the quality of our grades up.

If you are looking for a quality bulk supply of vintage clothing for your store, then Dust Factory Vintage Clothing Wholesale could possibly the solution that you are looking for.

What to Look Out For When Buying Vintage Clothing Wholesale

Now there are a few Vintage Clothing Suppliers out there that may operate a little differently. Some Vintage Clothing Warehouse Wholesalers have their own retail stores, I would be very cautious of ordering wholesale form these type of suppliers for good reason. In most cases these suppliers are getting their Vintage Clothing in bulk from the Rag House, then take out the rare and good selling items and put them in their own retail shop or shops, leaving the rest of the un-desirable items to be sold as wholesale. A good quality vintage wholesaler does not do this at all, but instead leaves the hard to find rare items in their mix so that their mixes and grades are desirable by everyone.

Other things to Remember When Purchasing Vintage Wholesale :

  • Look out for Vintage Clothing Wholesalers that let buyers hand pick from their location – this will always mess up the quality of their grades.
  • Look Out for Vintage Clothing Wholesalers that have their own retail shops or online retail stores -  they will keep the good products for their shops and sale the rest to you as wholesale
  • If you have a limited market, purchasing Vintage Clothing Wholesale may not be the best investment for your funds - you will need to find you products another way.
  • Look Out for Rag Houses that wholesale vintage clothing- If they sale used and vintage clothing, often times their vintage grades are mostly modern, and not resealable as vintage.

For more information about Ordering Vintage Clothing Wholesale for you store check out our FAQ’s Follow Us >

Also check out the Article Why Vintage Clothing for more information about Vintage Clothing.

Clothing Recycling Goes Curbside as Demand Rises

Donated Vintage Clothing

goodwill donations source USA Today

Did you ever wonder what happens to your clothing after you put it into a donation bin? Sometimes it ends up in a thrift store, sometimes it ends up in a vintage shop and sometimes it ends up being processed to be reused as a wiping rag.

Wendy Koch, an investigative reporter at USA Today recently took a look into the recycled clothing industry, where the clothes end up when you donate them and where they end up if you don’t. With the average American throwing out over 70lbs of used textiles a year, each one of us is responsible for what we do with our old duds.

From: USATODAY

Clothes recycling is expanding with curbside pickups and in-store collection bins, but what happens to donated items? USA TODAY’s Wendy Koch finds out.

Clothes recycling is going curbside in more U.S. towns as global prices rise for the used apparel, shoes and linens that Americans often toss in the trash.

Since September, more than a dozen local governments — in Arizona, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Washington state — have begun curbside pickup of textiles, often in special bags next to bins containing paper and cans. New York City has put clothing collection bins in nearly 250 apartment buildings in the last two years.

Businesses, too, are placing collection bins in parking lots and gas stations. In the last year, The North Face, H&M and other retailers have begun using in-store bins to offer customers store vouchers for donating clothes — whatever the brand, and sometimes, whatever the condition.

The nation’s robust recycling industry is increasingly targeting clothes — even those that are stained, ripped, mismatched or out-of-fashion. Companies and non-profit groups are partnering with cities eager to reduce landfill costs. They pick up the clothes, sell or reprocess them into wiping rags and other goods, and give the cities or local charities a cut of the pie — often pennies per pound.

“”It’s a trend more cities are considering.” says Tom Watson, a recycling official in Washington state’s King County, where the Seattle suburb of Issaquah has teamed up with waste collector CleanScapes for curbside pickups. As a result, he says non-profits such as Goodwill Industries International and Salvation Army face more competition for donations.

Queen Creek, Ariz., launched a curbside pilot project in September that collected 27,000 pounds of material in four months and earned nearly $3,000 for both the city and its Boys and Girls Club. It partnered with United Fibers, a company that turns textiles into insulation

“This is stuff I wouldn’t want to give away,” says Ramona Simpson, the town’s environmental programs supervisor, referring to items that are no longer wearable and wouldn’t sell at Goodwill or other charity stores. She says the town, after developing a stronger bag for collecting clothes, will soon relaunch the program.

Salvation Army began partnering this year with Massachusetts’ Brockton and Worcester to pick up clothes curbside. Community Recycling, a for-profit that sells clothes for reuse, started pickups in October in Pennsylvania’s Newtown and a dozen neighboring communities and will do the same next month in Westville, N.J.

“Anything that is clean and dry can be reused or recycled,” says Jackie King, executive director of Secondary Materials and Recycled Textiles Association, an industry group. She says nearly half of donated clothes are sold for reuse, mostly overseas where demand and prices have risen.

Goodwill’s Michael Meyer says per-pound international prices vary but have risen from a low of about three cents to 20 cents. He says his non-profit, which requests “new and gently used” items to fund job training programs, sells the “vast majority” at its stores, outlets or auctions. What’s left, he says, is sold to companies that recycle the material into other products or sell them for reuse overseas.

King says the average American throws away 70 pounds of clothing, linens and other textiles each year. Textiles account for 5% of municipal waste, because only about 15% of them are recycled — compared with 72% of newspapers and 50% of soda cans, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

“There’s a lot of room for improvement,” says Jennifer Berry of Earth911.com, a website that lists, by ZIP code, places where myriad items can be recycled.

“Clothes clog our landfills. They don’t decompose”, says Kelly Jamieson of Planet Aid, a non-profit with bright yellow collection bins in many metro areas. “We’re very privileged people. We throw away things many other people never would.”

Her group placed bins on college campuses nationwide last week as part of the “OneShirt Challenge” for Earth Day, aimed at educating students on the need to recycle even the rattiest T-shirts.

“My friends just let things pile up in their rooms, which is a pretty big waste,” says Jan Nguyen, a University of Maryland student who’s donating old athletic shoes. She says she rarely throws anything away and uses socks that have lost their mate as chalkboard erasers.

With super-cheap manufacturing. clothes are falling apart and being thrown away at a faster rate, says Heather Rogers, author of Green Gone Wrong: How Our Economy is Undermining the Environmental Revolution. “There’s been a transformation of clothing into a disposable item.”

Watson, the Washington recycling official, says consumers should consider buying fewer but higher-quality items that will last longer, noting the average American buys at least twice as many pieces of clothing as 20 years ago. He suggests they avoid impulsive purchases, take good care of their clothes and, when possible, buy used items at thrift stores.


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