Recycling

recyclingReduce, Reuse, Recycle
Recycling is process of turning used materials (trash or waste) into new products. You do this to prevent waste of potentially useful materials, reduce the consumption of fresh raw materials, and reduce energy usage and reduce air pollution. Recycling is a key component of modern waste reduction and is the third component of the “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” waste hierarchy.




Wholesale Vintage Clothing Catalog 2018

Get your hands on the latest Dust Factory Vintage Catalog and make sourcing Vintage Clothing Fun Again!

Renegade Americana grapples 90’s Urban Style . Cultural emphasis on Moto, Street, Beach with a hint of Post Punk Grunge. Read more

A Few Steps to improve the Bottom Line Vintage Shops

vintage shop notes

A smart business owner understands the inherent value of goal setting in steering a growing business in the right direction. Unfortunately, figuring out exactly what the right direction is—and the road map to get there—isn’t as much of a no-brainer.

More than 80 percent of the 300 small business owners surveyed in the recent 4th Annual Staples National Small Business Survey said that they don’t keep track of their business goals, and 77 percent have yet to achieve their vision for their company.

This time, instead of setting mindless resolutions that you never plan on obtaining, why not try to make a difference. We have put together a list of twelve steps that are geared to help improve your bottom line. Hopefully these important retail business resolutions won’t take YOU over a decade to become habit, because these steps represent the traits we all need if we want to achieve long-term, big time success.
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Vintage T-Shirts 101

Vintage T-shirts Wholesale

“The t-shirt is a symbol of freedom, but also a rebellion to society”. Rin Taken. Did you know that the t-shirt is as North American as apple pie and blue jeans.

It wasn’t until after the fighter pilots in the South Pacific returned home from WW2, in the 50’s, that it was finally acceptable to wear an undershirt as a t-shirt. The first Surf Board Shapers had no idea that screen printing their logo on a t-shirt would change North American fashion forever. In the 80’s T-shirt branding evolved from a grass roots marketing tool, to a billion dollar industry. Before a sneaker logo could sell a t-shirt, it had to have a great print or be a billboard and say something only a t-shirt could get away with. From Novelty tee’s to brand tees no one could resist the comfort of a cotton tee

vintage t-shirt tags

The first thing to look for when searching for authenticity of the perfect vintage tee is the tag/label. Before the store brand sold a tee, it was the brand on the blank itself that sold it. Knowing what to look for will save a lot of time during the hunt. Different tags can tell you about the era you tee come from. Current day American Made t-shirt manufactures continuously try to match the one of a kind comfort and feel found only in a 80’s Screen star t-shirt blank.

vintage rock concert t-shirt

Rock concert tees tell others that not only did you support the art of rocking by purchasing the newest 8 track released by your Rock Mentor, but you attended these ground breaking rock services yourself. Beware these are not to be mistaken as current day overprinted reproductions sold to the squares at urban corporate mall stores; but a genuine rare black market concert tee. Only recognizable traits are in the original print, date, tag and quality of blank. Some concert T-shirts will sell for well over $1000 in the dealer trade. The authenticity and timeless prints set these apart.

Find Vintage Tee’s Wholesale :: DUSTFACTORYVINTAGE.COM

Rag & Bone “Textile Recycling 101”

The folks over at Waist Online have a detailed page with allot of useful information about Textile Recycling. They note that textile recycling originated in the Yorkshire Dales about 200 years ago. These days the ‘rag and bone’ men are textile reclamation businesses, which collect textiles for reuse (often abroad), and send material to the ‘wiping’ and ‘flocking’ industry and fibres to be reclaimed to make new garments. Textiles made from both natural and man-made fibres can be recycled.

Why Bother:

It is estimated that more than 1 million tons of textiles are thrown away every year, with most of this coming from household sources. Textiles make up about 3% by weight of a household bin. At least 50% of the textiles we throw away are recyclable, however, the proportion of textile wastes reused or recycled annually in the US is only around 20%.

Although the majority of textile waste originates from household sources, waste textiles also arise during yarn and fabric manufacture, garment-making processes and from the retail industry. These are termed post-industrial waste, as opposed to the post-consumer waste which goes to jumble sales and charity shops. Together they provide a vast potential for recovery and recycling.

 

Recovery and recycling provide both environmental and economic benefits. Textile recovery:

  • Reduces the need for landfill space. Textiles present particular problems in landfill as synthetic (man-made fibres) products will not decompose, while woollen garments do decompose and produce methane, which contributes to global warming.
  • Reduces pressure on virgin resources.
  • Aids the balance of payments as we import fewer materials for our needs.
  • Results in less pollution and energy savings, as fibers do not have to be transported from abroad.

Reclaiming fiber avoids many of the polluting and energy intensive processes needed to make textiles from virgin materials, including: –

  • Savings on energy consumption when processing, as items do not need to be re-dyed or scoured.
  • Less effluent, as unlike raw wool, it does not have to be thoroughly washed using large volumes of water.
  • Reduction of demand for dyes and fixing agents and the problems caused by their use and manufacture.

How, what and where of recycling textiles:

The majority of post-consumer textiles are currently collected by charities like The Salvation Army, Good Will and Chalk. Some charities, for example Good Will and The Salvation Army, sort collected material selling it on to merchants in the appropriate sectors.

Some postindustrial waste is recycled ‘in-house’, usually in the yarn and fabric manufacturing sector. The rest, aside from going to landfill or incineration, is sent to merchants.

Collection Method’s:

At present the consumer has the option of putting textiles in ‘clothes banks’, taking them to charity shops or having them picked up for a donation drive.

The Salvation Army is the largest operator of textile banks in the US. On average, each of these banks is estimated to collect about six tons of textiles per year. Combined with door-to-door collections, The Salvation Army’s textile recycling operations account for the processing of in excess of 17,000 tons of clothing a year. Clothes are given to the homeless, sold in charity shops or sold in developing countries in Africa, the Indian sub-continent and parts of Eastern Europe. Nearly 70% of items put into clothing banks are reused as clothes, and any un-wearable items are sold to merchants to be recycled and used as factory wiping cloths.

Processing and Outlets for Waste Textiles

All collected textiles are sorted and graded at a "Rag House" by highly skilled, experienced workers, who are able to recognize the large variety of fiber types resulting from the introduction of synthetics and blended fiber fabrics. Once sorted the items are sent to various destinations as outlined below:

Post industrial waste is often reprocessed in house. Clippings from garment manufacture are also used by fiber reclaimers to make into garments, felt and blankets.

Some selected items will be sold to the "Vintage Market" and reused by designers fashioning garments and bags from recovered items. Companies like Dust Factory Vintage grade the textiles even more to produce mixes that will sell in trendy Vintage Shops in te US, Japan and Europe, however this is a very small sector within the overall destinations of textiles. For more information on what happens with Vintage Clothing click here.

What You Can Do:

  • Take your used clothes to a textile bank. Contact the recycling officer in your local authority if there are no banks in your area and ask why; they may collect textiles through other means. Alternatively you can take used clothing to local charity shops.
  • Give old clothes/shoes/curtains/handbags etc. to jumble sales. Remember to tie shoes together: part of the 6% of textiles which is wastage for merchants are single shoes.
  • Buy second-hand clothes – you can often pick up unusual period pieces! If bought from a charity shop, it will also benefit a charity.
  • Buy things you are likely to wear a long time – a dedicated follower of fashion can also be a green one if items are chosen carefully.
  • Look for recycled content in the garments you buy. This should be on the label, though at present there is no conventional marking scheme and some companies do not always advertise the recycled content.
  • Buy cloth wipers instead of disposable paper products as the product can be used repeatedly.

Used Clothing vs. New Clothing

Why buy used clothing?

I guess the best way to answer this question would to first answer  the question, why buy new clothing? Well we buy new clothing, or accessories for a few different reasons. The average consumer may need new clothes because their other clothing is old or soiled. This is a good reason, but not necessarily the only reason why we are drawn to purchase new stuff. In most cases, at least here in the United States, we a drawn to purchase new items of clothing because we feel the need to have new stuff. Even when our old stuff, well just isn’t that old.

It all starts out at a young age. Young girls want to look like the pop stars on TV, young boys want to look like the athletes. They are not picking out clothes for functionality or warmth, but instead only for a look. For this reason the average consumer is drawn to purchase new clothing not for a need, but for a look. If it is a look that you are going after, why not purchased the clothing used.

There is a good chance, no matter how original you think that your style is, that somebody else was chasing that look before you.  When they went after the look it may have been the “New Thing” so they paid top dollar for some designer duds that were just a knock-off of a collection created 20 years prior. You, the much wiser hipster, already knew that with all of your independent fashion knowledge, so why would you be suckered into paying top dollar? Why not pay half the price, or a tenth of the price and get the same article vintage or slightly used at a wholesale rate?


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