Sustainable Design

Sustainable design in everyday products and transportation.




Why Vintage? (continued 2)

Why Vintage Clothing?
When vintage shops customers were narrowed between theater students and collectors, buyers didn’t have to continuously re-fill their racks. As the market grew so did most buyers strategies.

Buyers for Vintage Clothing Stores in the past are different from the buyers of today. When vintage shops customers were narrowed between theater students and collectors, buyers didn’t have to continuously re-fill their racks. As the market grew so did most buyers strategies. It seams some buyers are content with their techniques from the past, while others are forced to obtain their merchandise in other ways. Differences between the time and resources that the actual vintage buyers have, will predicate how and what type of merchandise each shop will carry. Some buyers choose to get their pieces by continuously spending there weekends hitting up vintage swap meets, garage sales, or estate sales. Everyone at one time or so, vintage collector or not, has spent a Saturday or Sunday morning driving from garage sale to garage sale. Some times it pays off and the buyer can find great eclectic pieces through shopping this way, but more times than none they’ll spend hours upon hours sifting through piles of clothes, or whatever the hunt is for, in peoples front yards to come up with a couple of pieces or none. A vintage collectors time is valuable, seeing how most buyers are in fact shop owners, and would rather spend time at there shop where they are needed most, instead of peoples yards. Vintage Clothing Swap Meets are a good alternative, if a city near the buyer even hosts one. Unfortunately most vendors at these swap meets are in fact shop owners themselves, trying to sling there second hand dead stock* for cheap, while they sell there good vintage merchandise at a retail price. Sometimes good deals can be found, but again, the time and effort to sift through these swap meets can be demanding, leaving buyers to many times empty handed.

Most Vintage buyers that need to purchase in bulk, skip over garage sales and vintage clothing swap meets completely, and go directly for the source. They hit a rag house, the end of the rode for most clothes. Rag houses are warehouses that collect every charitable clothing item that anyone, anywhere, has ever given away. They are kind of like the manufacturer for the vintage clothing industry, if you can accept that they are not actually manufacture anything. They are instead more like the ultimate supplier for the industry. Although supplying for vintage buyers is not what the company are set up to do. Some donated items are picked out and sold in second hand thrift stores. Nonetheless, it seems that more times than none, the clothing ends up at a rag house that will bail it, weigh it, and ship it to another country. Vintage shop buyers have bean hitting up rag houses for years now, asking them to sift through there merchandise and pull out pieces that would sell in a shop. Many rag houses have found that it is indeed profitable to separate vintage pieces from the rest of their rags, to sell to vintage collectors. For a little more per pound than the average bails, a vintage buyer can purchase 1000-pound bales of merchandise that they need for their shop. This is a better solution than hunting down single pieces at garage sales or swap meets, but it still leaves a lot to be un-desired.

CONTINUE

(Land of yogurt, granola, and vinatge Swapmeets. If youre lucky enough, like the folks in California, you might just beable to take a Sunday off and head to the Rose Bowl for a Vinatge Clothing Swapmeet. You may have better luck at one of these than at the neighborhood garage sales. Just be ready to bargain, because most vendors have a Vinatge shop somewhere else. FROM THE TOP One sunday a month in Los Angeles, California the Rose Bowl hosts a section for vintage clotheing at there swap meet. All pictires taken from Denim An American Legend. Iain Finlayson. p.36)

Recycled Clothing 101: 5 Simple Ways to Recycle Clothing

Vintage Clothing Marketing Notes

Some things in life are just that simple, like recycling your clothing. It does not matter if you are thirteen years old or 85 years old, there are a number of ways that you can recycle your old duds. If you are curious as to why you should recycle your clothing than think about this number for a second, one million tons.  One million tons is the estimated amount of textiles put into landfills each year, with most of them coming from household waste.

The following is a list of Five (5) Simple Ways to Recycle Your Clothing

  1. Hand-me-downs This may be easier for the younger readers, but you can give your unused clothes to your younger brother or sister. Moms call this Hand-Me-Downs. It is a very simple concept but very effective if used properly. If you don’t have a younger brother or sister, give your old clothes to a smaller  neighbor or cousin. See…very simple.
  2. Resale Shop If you are the thrifty shopper or if you think that your are a trendy diva that doesn’t really know that many people possibly due to living in a new location or having a sour attitude, then why not take your old clothing  to the resale shop. Beware, there is a good chance that there might be a  chubster(1) behind the counter at the resale shop waiting to dish you out a piece of humble pie. This could bring some back down to the reality possibly realizing that their washed up style might not be so unique after all.  However, it is worth the chance to make some money on your old finds, and it shouldn’t stop you from moving on.
  3. Donate Your Clothes After picking up whats left of your ego, and your entire collection of last seasons rags from the by  counter at the resale shop, the chubster behind the counter will tell you that if you want you can donate your clothing to their clothing bin, and they will see that it gets to a charity. Of coarse you will want nothing to do with them,but they do bring up a good point, you could donate your clothing… maybe just not to them. If you don’t care either way leave your clothing at the resale donation bin, or if you want, there are plenty of other local charities that you can drop your old clothes at. Many of them will even pick them up from your front porch if you take the 1 minute out of your day to call them. They will see that your clothing is getting re-used. Just google local charities in your area.
  4. Local Clothing Swap If your hurting for cash , and you still cant get over the fact that the re-sale shop didn’t want a single item out of your collection, you could try a clothing swap. Most cities have volunteers that organize clothing swaps. You can find them by Google..ing “Local Clothing Swap” or checking your local Craigs List listings. A clothing swap is a gathering where a bunch of like-minded people bring their old clothing and trade out their old garments for others. If no one in your area is hosting a clothing swap then why not put together one for yourself. It can be done with neighbors and friends, or a through a church or local charity.
  5. Repurpose Your Clothing Ok I may have lied, I said that I had five simple ways to recycle fashion and this last one may or may not be that simple. This will depend on how creative you are, and how good you are with a sewing machine. If you don’t know how to sew, it is worth learning , if you do know how to sew then this will be simple. Any dress can be turned into a top or skirt. Any t-shirt can be turned into a bathing suit or t-shirt for a kid. Any pants can be turned into shorts.  It is a simple concept, but so often over looked. Sometimes you don’t even have to know how to sew, you just need to be able to use a pair of scissors.

Now make it happen. Next time you go through your closet and clear out two pieces or five bag fulls of clothing think about these five options that you now have before playing the fool and putting them into the trash.

(1) chubster: tacky overweight hipster girl or boy

Classic Vintage Wear & Tear

Retro Style Wear
Over the years Dust Factory developed a style that is synonymous with vintage wear and tear. The creative style captures the elegance and authenticity from the original wear on an item. The “used look” to the trained eye is a classic look, separating the item from its counterparts.

Some things just look better with Age

When it comes to particular fabrics or materials, some items just look better with age. Take denim and leather for example, years of wear and tear give these items an authentic look and comfortable fit. Contemporary designers are always trying to find new ways to make their denim jeans or jackets look like they are worn in. They add different washes, wholes, tears and  stretch marks in an attempt to make to items look “vintage”.

Read more

Classic Vintage Wear & Tear

Retro Style Wear
Over the years Dust Factory developed a style that is synonymous with vintage wear and tear. The creative style captures the elegance and authenticity from the original wear on an item. The “used look” to the trained eye is a classic look, separating the item from its counterparts.

Some things just look better with Age

When it comes to particular fabrics or materials, some items just look better with age. Take denim and leather for example, years of wear and tear give these items an authentic look and comfortable fit. Contemporary designers are always trying to find new ways to make their denim jeans or jackets look like they are worn in. They add different washes, wholes, tears and  stretch marks in an attempt to make to items look “vintage”.

Read more

Tips for Wearing Vintage Clothing

From: Huffington Post
By: Natasha Koifman


Image Source: http://hollywoodreporter.com


Sometimes, I even think about their original owner — wondering how differently we’re wearing the same piece, how different our lives are. There’s something magical and mysterious about the connection to a woman you know nothing about other than that you wore and loved the same piece of clothing or jewelry and that somehow it has lasted all this time ~ Natasha Koifman

If you’ve flipped through May’s magazines you will know that the fashion world is waiting with baited breath for this weekend’s release of The Great Gatsby. The classic novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald has been adapted by Baz Luhrman (of Moulin Rouge fame) and, if the trailer is anything to go by, it will be a visual and style spectacle.

It’s remarkable to see the impact this one movie has had on designers in recent seasons — it started even when the movie was just announced. Chanel Haute Couture, Oscar de la Renta, Miu Miu and Alexander McQueen are just some of the designers inspired by this era. Flapper-style dresses, dropped hemlines and luxe deco-inspired jewels started to make a big impact on runways that trickled all the way down to stores.

Now, with the release of the movie, Tiffany & Co. unveiled a new collection of jewels inspired by the latest adaptation…including the ring-to-wrist pearl and diamond stunner worn by Carrie Mulligan on the current Vogue cover.
[…]

While current designers and collections offer many options for those of us enchanted with these styles, we can also go right to the source. On a recent trip to New York, I went searching for some authentic vintage finds. The appeal is quickly apparent; not only can you find something truly unique and beautifully made, but there’s also a sense of history and character to the piece. I love the idea of mixing a vintage piece of clothing or jewelry with my more current and contemporary pieces.

Sometimes, I even think about their original owner — wondering how differently we’re wearing the same piece, how different our lives are. There’s something magical and mysterious about the connection to a woman you know nothing about other than that you wore and loved the same piece of clothing or jewelry and that somehow it has lasted all this time.

But there’s another reason to think about shopping for a vintage piece; it is both ethical and green. I’m not saying that I’m only ever going to wear vintage clothes… but shopping occasionally for vintage is a small way of buying something lasting and special […]

Here are some more tips for shopping vintage:

(1) Follow your heart and your style: When you’re submersed in that vintage shopping experience, it’s easy to lose sight of your own style. Remember you’re not looking for a period costume, but for something that can be incorporated into your existing wardrobe. For me, this means sticking to my trademark palette of black. Think about how you’ll wear the vintage item, how you can update it (with either complementary or juxtaposing items). Vintage is one area where you can really follow your heart and make that impulse purchase because if you wait, you’ll never find that item again.

(2) Ignore sizes and embrace alterations: We all know that sizing has crept up in recent years. This means that what was a size 6 in past decades may be significantly smaller that what we call a size 6 today. If you’re buying online, ask the seller for waist and bust measurements to be confident the item will fit. If you’re buying in person, be sure to try on. Most vintage store-owners can also make recommendations about where small repairs and alterations can be made on a piece too. Don’t rule out a little bit of tailoring to get that perfect fit!

(3) Make a statement: With so many options for great basics in every style, shape and colour today, look specifically for something DIFFERENT when you’re shopping vintage. Seek out bold accessories and embellished clothing, like beading or lace work. Your vintage piece should be a conversation starter… and one secret you’ll gleefully share!

Vintage style is not just something to admire on the silver screen. With a little exploration and experimentation, you can give a vintage piece a new lease on life, a loving home and in the process, give yourself a new fashion outlook!

READ MORE


Keep Rollin. Next Page »



vintage wholesale catalog