Organic




Brooklyn Grange Rooftop Garden : Season Two

Rooftop Garden

The Worlds Largest Rooftop garden has just kicked off it’s second growing season.

The second season is in full swing for the rooftop urban farmers at Brooklyn Grange Located atop a six-story 1919 warehouse. Krista Leahy at Inhabitat just did a great piece on this 40,000 square foot organic rooftop farm built by Bromley Caldari architects on a random rooftop in Brooklyn.

“After a successful first growing and selling season that began last spring, the farmers at Brooklyn Grange are continuing their production of organic produce that includes 40 varietals of juicy tomatoes, peppers, fennel, salad greens, kale, swiss chard, beans of all sorts and a variety of delicious root vegetables like beets, carrots, and radishes, as well as plenty of herbs.”

Brooklyn Grange’s organic produce is grown in 7.5″ deep beds with rooflite soil. This soil is produces by Pennsylvania soil company Skyland, Rooflite. This special soil is a lightweight soil composed of organic matter compost and small porous stones wich break down to add trace minerals that are needed for the produce to grow into a healthy mature state. The farm has a nine month growing season and everything that they grow is sustainable and good for you. In the winter time they used cover-crops like rye, buckwheat, vetch and clove to produce year around.

Rooftop Garden

Brooklyn Grange is looking to expand to many more rooftops in an attempt to increase the education and training available to those interested in urban farming. Check out their website at brooklyngrangefarm.com

Source & Images Courtesy of Inhabitat

Certified Organic Wool

Certified Organic Wool

Certified Organic Wool | Image Courtesy of treehugger.com

At Dust Factory Vintage Clothing we always look forward to new to new seasons fashion collections, this coming Autumn/Winter 2011 is no exception.

Our favorite go to choice for fabrics is Recycled Textiles, however our favorite natural fiber of the season is organic wool. But as EcoSalon’s Amy DuFault points out (via Ecco Eco), there are both “environmental and ethical complexities of this natural fiber we so adore.

Last year O-Wool, the leading certified-organic wool at the time, was beginning to fold due to financial reasons. Since then, Tooney Wool Company in Philadelphia, PA, has become the new big dog and owner and distributor of certified-organic-yarns. Whose past clientele list is rather impressive with brands like Patagonia, Timberland, J.Crew, Linda Loudermilk, Diane von Furstenberg, Loomstate, Bahar Shahpar, and Bodkin.

Organic Wool Sheep

Certified Organic Wool | Image Courtesy of Treehugger.com

Tree Hugger has great sideshow presentation with Tom’s of Maine Founder showing you how to Produce Ethical Wool undergarments. Check Here to View!

In an interview with EcoSalon, Jocelyn Tunney, of Tunney Wool Company, says “One would want to purchase organic wool for the same reasons as one would want to purchase organic food.” She continues, below.

It’s a more sustainable farming solution, is kinder to the animals and is healthier for the consumer. Conventional wool is grown like conventional food – the land and sheep are sprayed and dipped in pesticides as a cheap means to increase salable product. The land [certified-]organic wool comes from has to go through the same transition and certification process as the land organic food comes from.”

Let’s not forget when it comes to purchasing wool products the most ecological wool is the the stuff you already have hanging in your closet, recycled wool or what you find at a vintage clothing store or thrift shop is close second. However when you don’t have either of these options you should make sure that you are purchasing certified-organic and mulesing-free wool.

Information Courtesy of Treehugger.com and EcoSalon.com

Brazilian Eco Longboard


The Dry Leaf (Folha Seca) from Brazilian based Lets EVO is a clean way to travel and is made from some unique and sustainable materials developed by Fibra Sustainable Design. They start off with the Papunha veneer which is produced from the waste material of the sustainable palmheart industry. The use of this byproduct to construct a new sort of plywood extends the life cycle of the palm plant and provides income for small farmers who depend on this vegetation. The Dry Leaf is a stunningly elegant and creative endeavor from its inside out.
Natural fibers procured from fair trade and native to Brazil, such as jute, malva, and curaua, are used as a natural fiberglass along with recycled polypropylene. The use of these natural fibers benefits small farmers and produces no polluting waste material. The core of the Dry Leaf is Mosso Organic Bamboo which is grown sustainably in Brazil and treated with non-toxic vegetable based adhesives.
The Dry Leaf was submitted to Volvo’s EcoDesign competition and was a finalist for the 2008 competition earlier this year.

Info & Images Courtesy of Inhabitat & Green Upgrader

ORGANIC is Banned


Mairi Beautyman over at Tree Hugger had a great point, something to think about in 2008. She noted that you better think twice before tossing ‘organic’ into a sentence. The word is one of 19 words or phrases on Lake Superior State University’s annual List of Words Banished from the Queen’s English for Mis-Use, Over-Use and General Uselessness.
“[‘Organic’ is] overused and misused to describe not only food, but computer products or human behavior, and often used when describing something as ‘natural,’ says a quote on the university’s Web site (attributed to Crystal Giordano of Brooklyn, New York).
After seeing it refer to bottled water and pancake batter in a spray can, we’re going to have to agree.

Other words and phrases on the list: Perfect storm; waterboarding; wordsmith; back in the day; and sweet. via ::Yahoo News Also see ::USDA Waters Down Organic Standards




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