Bio Fuel




Algae Batteries

Algae is considered the next big break through in bio fuels. That slimy, slippery stuff might also be a key to paper thin biodegradable batteries according to researchers at Uppsala University in Sweden. These batteries could soon compete with commercial lithium-ion batteries.

According to Inhabitat.:”Conducting polymers have long been thought to be a solution in developing lightweight, flexible, nonmetal batteries. But up until now, these polymers have had been impractical because regular paper can’t hold enough of them work effectively. Now Uppsala researcher Maria Stromme and her team has found that the smelly algae species that clumps on beaches, known as Cladophora, can also be used to make a type of cellulose that has 100 times the surface area of cellulose found in paper. That means it can hold enough conducting polymers to effectively recharge and hold electricity for long amounts of time.”

“The algae-based paper sheet batteries hold up to 200% more charge than regular paper-based cellulose batteries, and they can recharge in as little as 11 seconds. Eventually, they could be used in any application that requires flexible electronics — for example, clothing or packaging that lights up. Perhaps most importantly, the algae batteries could one day cut down on e-waste from conventional metal batteries.”

The First Wave Farm


The worlds first commercial wave farm was launched live at the end of September in Agucadoura. Located a few miles off of the coast of Portugal. Designed by Pelamis Wave Power, the farm employs three Wave Energy Converters – snakelike, semi-submerged devices that generate electricity with hydraulic rams driven by waves. This first phase of the new renewable energy farm is rated at 2.25 MW with 3 machines, and the the second phase will add an additional 25 machines to bring the capacity to 21 MW – enough to power 15,000 homes!

According to an article written in Inhabitat by Bridgette Steffen last month, “Pelamis Wave Energy Converters are tethered to the ocean floor by cables and are pointed perpendicular to the coastline. Each device is composed of several sections connected with articulated joints. As the waves roll in past the device, each section is driven up and down, while the hydraulic rams inside resist the motion. This resistance pumps high pressure fluid through hydraulic motors, which drive electric generators, thereby producing electricity. This electricity is then transmitted via underwater cables to the mainland.”

Waves are as common as the rising sun. This is a great way to produce energy and something that we will keep our eyes on at Born Activist.

Source Courtesy of Inhabitat
Image Courtesy of Inhabitat

Green Flight


Inhabitat had a great write up on Ec0- Air travel that is worth bringing attention to. Air travel is getting greener- at first the EcoJet and Dreamliner lower-emissions aircrafts came onto scene, and now with a ground-breaking development from Green Flight International, biodiesel has succesfully been tested for jet usage. Developed by Biodiesel Solutions and tested on an L-29 military aircraft just last week, biofuel may just be the next sustainable frontier in the challenge to travel more eco-responsibly.
On October 5, The Biojet I, an Aero L-29 Delfin aircraft, took off from the Reno-Stead Airport and flew to an altitude of 17,000 feet. While the first tests were done with a mixture of Bio-diesel and regular jet fuel, the last flight was done entirely on 100% renewable bio-diesel fuel. According to the pilot, there was no reduction in performance compared to conventional jet-fuel. Granted, the L-29 is a rather unique aircraft. Originally built during the 1960’s and better known as Czechoslovakia’s first locally designed and built jet aircraft, the plane is rated to fly on several types of fuel which makes it an excellent choice for testing biofuels. It will be interesting to see if this test can be translated to other plane models.
Are biodiesel fuels the future for airplane flights? This test program between Green Flight International and Biodiesel Solutions was a unique and exciting opportunity to show what can be done in renewable fuels.” said Rudi Wiedemann, president of Biodiesel Solutions. The very idea of using 100% biodiesel to fly a jet aircraft makes a compelling statement about the possibilities for the future of renewable energy and a healthier planet.

Not Just A Load


When slapped with an order to clean up the poop of 12,000 dairy cows, the Hefer Valley Cooperative Society built a manure-driven power station to solve their problems. The first of its kind in Israel, the plant was inaugurated this week and is expected to process 600 tons of manure a day and generate 2-2.4 megawatts per hour (MW/h) within the year. At present the plant is operating at about half its capacity, and most of the energy is feeding back to the national grid.

The project is a joint effort between Tambour Hefer Ecology Ltd and Granite Hacarmel Investments Ltd. Granite Hacarmel CEO Amiaz Sagis said, “This is unquestionably an important milestone. This facility fits in with Granite Hacarmel’s strategy to invest in infrastructures and ecology. The company is also investing resources to developalternative energy, water treatment, and desalination.” While it wasn’t made cheap “ the new plant located in Hadera cost about $10 million to build, which included a $2 million grant from Israel’s Ministry of Agriculture to help improve Israel’s much-polluting dairy industry. First the manure is sterilized, then the solid and liquid waste are processed to produce methane, which drives
the generators. This Story was Originally Posted by Karin Kloosterman, Jerusalem, Israel on Tree Hugger.

Not Just A Load

When slapped with an order to clean up the poop of 12,000 dairy cows, the Hefer Valley Cooperative Society built a manure-driven power station to solve their problems. The first of its kind in Israel, the plant was inaugurated this week and is expected to process 600 tons of manure a day and generate 2-2.4 megawatts per hour (MW/h) within the year. At present the plant is operating at about half its capacity, and most of the energy is feeding back to the national grid.

The project is a joint effort between Tambour Hefer Ecology Ltd and Granite Hacarmel Investments Ltd. Granite Hacarmel CEO Amiaz Sagis said, “This is unquestionably an important milestone. This facility fits in with Granite Hacarmel’s strategy to invest in infrastructures and ecology. The company is also investing resources to developalternative energy, water treatment, and desalination.” While it wasn’t made cheap “ the new plant located in Hadera cost about $10 million to build, which included a $2 million grant from Israel’s Ministry of Agriculture to help improve Israel’s much-polluting dairy industry. First the manure is sterilized, then the solid and liquid waste are processed to produce methane, which drives
the generators. This Story was Originally Posted by Karin Kloosterman, Jerusalem, Israel on Tree Hugger.


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